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Attendees: Trisha Gee; Mike Barker; Barry Cranford; Martijn Verburg; Ben Evans; Simon Maple

As an overall note, we don’t assign action points to specific people in the meeting other than those whose names are mentioned above.  Rather than swamp ourselves with process, we’re feeling our way around to see what’s going to work best for us as a grassroots user organisation.

  1. We agreed that Barry would hold the physical paperwork at his company offices. This resolves point 11 of the last meeting.
  2. We agreed unanimously that James Gough would be added to the LJC/JCP committee.
  3. Patrick Curran, the chair of the JCP, will be visiting London on July 9th. We resolved to hold a social at Vinopolis, open to all LJC members, to meet Patrick. Trish to organize.
  4. Ben to blog about the inactive JSRs to see if any LJC members are interested in helping to get them going again – the start of an “adopt a JSR” program.
  5. Ben to post to list about bean validation 1.1 JSR and see if any LJC members would be a good for for the EG that Emmanuel Bernard (Red Hat) is putting together.
  6. We agreed unanimously that Trish should act as tertiary for the JCP Committee, and attend EC (and JSR 348 – JCP.next) meetings in the event than neither Ben nor Martijn is available.
  7. We  discussed the possibility of setting up a “community interest” JCP mailing list for JUG leaders – to try to reduce the possibility of swamping the current jug-leaders mailing list. It was felt that this was worth discussing further with Bruno Souza (SouJava) and other community EC members.
  8. We discussed which forthcoming standards the LJC may be able to contribute to technically (ie areas where we have members who could make a good contribution). The initial list of obvious areas is: Bean Validation, Modularity / Jigsaw, Lambda, JMS 2.0, Coin 8 and MLVM. Further discussion is needed to see how we can best help our members to get involved.
  9. It was noted that we need to tag JCP-related posts on the blog as a way of keeping track of our involvement in the JCP and open work threads – this will also provide a useful public record of our contribution.
  10. Ben to organize the next Committee Meeting in mid-July.

LJC members – this is a unique opportunity for you to get involved in helping guide the future of the Java ecosystem! Please contact me (Ben Evans – @kittylyst on twitter, or through my profile on the LJC meetup.com site) and let’s talk!

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The London Java Community’s next free event is Infinspan, Data Grids and Cloud Storage on Tuesday July 26th at 6:30pm.

Please see link for details and to sign up – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/22954391/

Manik Surtani will present “Infinspan, Data Grids and Cloud Storage” – A use-case driven talk on Infinispan, an LGPL licensed data grid platform for use as a distributed data cache, low-latency in-memory object database and cloud-ready datastore. This talk will focus on several popular usage patterns, explaining how these usage patterns work their way into common software designs we see today, and how the use of a data grid can bring benefits. For each pattern, specific details on setting up and tuning Infinispan to serve such a purpose will be discussed. The format will include a presentation and some sample code.

Who should attend:

– Java Developers
– Technical Architects
– Technically savvy CTOs

Agenda:

18:00: Doors Open
18:30: A series of lightning talks from members of the London Java Community
19:00: Main presentation – Manik Surtani will present Infinspan, Data Grids and Cloud Storage
20:30: Networking

Bio:

Manik Surtani is a core R&D engineer at JBoss, a division of Red Hat. He is the founder of the Infinispan project, which he currently leads. He is also the spec lead of JSR 347 (Data Grids for the Java Platform), and represents Red Hat on the Expert Group of JSR 107 (Temporary caching for Java). His interests lie in cloud and distributed computing, autonomous systems and highly available computing. He has a background in artificial intelligence and neural networks, a field he left behind when he moved from academic circles to the commercial world. Since then, he’s been working with Java-related technologies, first for a startup focusing on knowledge management and information exchange, and later for a large London-based consultancy as a tech lead focused on e-commerce applications on large Java EE and peer-to-peer technology. Surtani is a strong proponent of open source development methodologies, ethos, and collaborative processes, and has been involved in open source since his first forays into computing.

Please Note:

Nearest tube: Barbican
Nearest Coffee Shop: Sun Coffee Shop, 55-63 Goswell Road, London, EC1V 7EN for if you arrive early
For after event drinks: The Slaughtered Lamb – 34-35 Great Sutton St, Clerkenwell, London, EC1V 0DX 

Please note this is a joint LJC/JBUG event. SkillsMatter are hosting this event and are handling the attendance – it is essential that you confirm your place at this link: http://skillsmatter.com/podcast/home/infinspan-data-grids-cloud/js-2047

 

Hi all,

As you know, we were one of the final nominations for the Ambassador category at the recent JAX innovation awards. Our very own Paul Fremantle was on hand to represent the LJC (thanks Paul!). Sadly, we couldn’t quite make it over the final hurdle, losing out to a Martin Odersky (who I think we can agree is a worthy winner!)

The JAX innovation awards is a fantastic celebration of the Java ecosystem and its community.  As you know they’re holding a another conference in London this year (http://jaxlondon.com/), I recommend you check it out!

The full gory details of the various categories and the winners can be found below (pretty much copy and pasted from the JAX press release).

Cheers,

Martijn

———————————————————-

The winners of the JAX Innovation Awards were announced tonight during a ceremony at the San Jose Convention Center, San Jose, CA, host this week to the very first JAX Conference to take place in the USA.

After an intensive 3 month program of nominations, judging and community votes, which saw thousands of votes cast, the Awards were presented by judging panel chair, Sebastian Meyen, and Mark Hazell, of organizers S&S Media.

The JAX Innovation Awards recognized and rewarded the excellence and innovation present across the Java Ecosystem, with 3 categories determined by community voting.

The Award winners were announced as:

  • Most Innovative Java Technology – JRebel
  • Most Innovative Java Company – Red Hat
  • Top Java Ambassador – Martin Odersky
  • Special Jury Award – Brian Goetz

Jevgeni Kabanov, founder and CTO of Zero Turnaround, the company behind JRebel, expressed his thanks to the communities for nominating and voting for JRebel as Most Innovative Java Technology.

Accepting his award via video link, Top Java Ambassador winner Martin Odersky said, “It is a great honour to be made top java ambassador. I see it as recognition of 16 years passionate work, first around Java, then around Scala, in which my goal has always been to blend functional programming methods in a smooth way into the Java environment.”

The presenters were joined on stage by Dan Allen, of Red Hat, to accept the Most Innovative Java Company Award, who said, “We feel honoured and excited, especially as this is a community based award and working together with the community is so valuable for all of us at Red Hat”.

Finally, Meyen announced the winner of a special Jury Award as Brian Goetz, Java language architect at Oracle. The official statement from the jury reads:

“The Jury‘s vote goes to Brian Goetz, who is now responsible for the Java language. He has demonstrated, that he will not rest on the laurels of Java’s past success, but elevate Java to the next level going forward. He deserves this award because the impact of his work will ripple far and wide through the community, far further than any individual contributions, present or past. Brian Goetz is not only evangelizing. He’s doing. And by doing he is shaping the future of the platform in a way that few others could. He’s been 100% dedicated to the Java community for well over
a decade, as both an independent and now the official Java Language Architect.“

The winner of each category receives $2,500 from S&S Media, and the recognition of their peers in the Java Ecosystem as best in class, 2011.

The Jury was made up from many well known personalities from the Java Ecosystem and included developers, analysts and publishers and included:

  • James Governor RedMonk
  • Dierk König Canoo Engineering AG
  • Kito D. Mann JSFCentral
  • Sebastian Meyen Software & Support Media
  • Fabiane Bizinella Nardon Java Champion & Duke Award Winner
  • Ted Neward Neward & Associates
  • Bola Rotibi Intellect Consulting
  • Bruno Souza Brazilian JavaMan
  • Darryl K. Taft Editor of eWeek (Ziff Davis Enterprise)

The Awards and Organizers:

The JAX Innovation Awards are organized by S&S Media Group, one of the most comprehensive one of the most comprehensive media providers of services for the IT and web world. Through its conferences, print magazines, online platforms, books, and trainings, S&S Media makes connections
to IT professionals and web and graphic designers from all industries. From developers and designers to architects, project managers, marketing professionals and CIOs, S&S Media provides a means to interact.

Among the best-known events of S&S Media are the conferences JAX!, BASTA!, Mobile TechCon and webinale. The company has offices around the globe, including London, San Francisco, Frankfurt and Potsdam For information about the Software & Support Media Group please visit: http://www.sandsmedia.com

The JAX Innovation Awards were originally conceived in 2006 in Germany with a European focus. To recognise the global extension of the JAX brand, the scale and scope of the JAX Innovation Awards was increased in 2011; inviting every company, community and person working in the Java Ecosystem Worldwide to input.

The winners:

Martin Odersky heads the programming research group at EPFL. His research interests cover fundamental as well as applied aspects of programming languages. The main focus if his work lies in the integration of object-oriented and functional programming. His research thesis is that the two paradigms are just two sides of the same coin and should be unified as much as possible. To prove this he has experimented a number of language designs, from Pizza to GJ to Functional Nets. He has also influenced the development of Java as a co-designer of Java generics and as the original
author of the current javac reference compiler. His current work concentrates on the Scala programming language, which unifies FP and OOP, while
staying completely interoperable with Java and .NET.

Red Hat is a leader in open source software. Red Hat’s middleware division focuses on enterprise middleware, primarily Java based, and is the organisation behind JBoss, the popular open source Java EE application server, the Hibernate ORM framework, the Seam framework, the Drools rule engine, jBPM, Infinispan, JGroups, RichFaces and several other popular open source projects. Red Hat middleware has been active in pushing the envelope of Java technology, and has led several JSRs, was instrumental in modernising and keeping Java EE compelling and relevant: through Java EE5, Java EE 6, EJB 3 and CDI specifications, among others. Red Hat middleware continues to push the boundaries of Java, making sure it is relevant to cloud and PaaS vendors. Red Hat is also an active contributor to OpenJDK, very important for vendorneutral Java adoption.

JRebel is a JVM-plugin that makes it possible for Java developers to instantly see any code change made to an app without redeploying. JRebel lets you see code changes instantly, versioning classes and resources individually and updating one at a time instead of as a lump application redeploy.
JRebel solved the problem that has plagued the Java industry from the start, catalyzed development of instant turnaround in various Java technologies and erased the competitive advantage enjoyed by dynamic languages.

Brian Goetz has been a professional software developer for more than twenty years. He is the author of the very successful ‘Java Concurrency in Practice’, and has written over 75 articles on Java development. He is one of the primary members of the Java Community Process JSR 166 Expert
Group (Concurrency Utilities), and has served on numerous other JCP Expert Groups. Brian is Java Language Architect at Oracle.

For information about the JAX Innovation Awards contact Hartmut Schlosser:
+49 (0) 696 300 8936
hschlosser@sandsmedia.com

For more information about JAX Conf, contact Mark Hazell:
+44 (0) 20 7401 4845
markh@sandsmedia.com

Hi all,

Thanks to everyone that made it out last night.

We had an amazing turn out, I didn’t count but looked like over 70 people in the audience. I had a lot of good feedback last night and you can see a review from Paul Grenyer here , the video will be available here  and please visit the Meetup event page or use the twitter tag #ljc_springroo to see or write comments and feedback.

Thanks goes firstly to Jan for coming down from Manchester to give the presentation last night and of course to Guy Remond and Cake Solutions for providing the pizzas and beer. Feel free to get in touch with Jan (Technical side) or Pete (Business side) for further information on Cake. It is well worth checking out the upcoming Agile World Conference that is being organised and run by Cake Solutions. Thanks also to Arthur Embleton for the Lightning talk on Play Framework, again it was well received from all I spoke to after the event. Finally thanks to SkillsMatter for providing the venue and making these events so easy to organise.

Whilst we don’t have any Spring Roo positions, we have a lot of roles involving Spring. If you would like to check out our latest jobs visit our job board. Please remember that we have new jobs in every week and some are placed before we advertise them, so for the best positions give Andrew, Kenric or myself a shout and we’ll let you know which roles would be the best match for you.

Our next presentation is on JVM Cloud Platforms – looking forward to seeing you there – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/21137121/

Thanks,
Barry

Hi all,

Thanks to everyone that made it out on Tuesday night.

We had a good turn out, I would say around 60-70 people came and went through the night. I understand many war stories were discussed, although as usual people seemed more keen to discuss recruitment war stories with me, which there seems to be no shortage of. We had a really good cross over with members from the Graduate Developer Community and had a few people along that have been getting involved with our the GDC Project Euler challenge which is open to LJC members and GDC members, but more suited to entry level developers (or those wanting to cross train into another language).

Special thanks to John, James and Martijn for greeting throughout the night and helping to build such a supportive atmosphere. If anyone is interested in helping out with some greeting in the future please let me know.

Don’t forget to check our latest jobs here although please remember that we have new jobs in every week and some are placed before we advertise them, so for the best positions give Andrew, Kenric or myself a shout and we’ll let you know which roles would be the best match for you.

Sign up to next months Developer Sessions here – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/16692823/

We are most likely going to base the event around the theme of Java in the Cloud, as we are having two presentations next month on Java/JVM Cloud platforms and tools.

Thanks,
Barry

The London Java Community’s next free event is – Next Free Event – JVM Cloud Platforms – Thursday July 14th – 6:30pm.

Please see link for details and to sign up – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/21137121/

WSO2 Stratos Cloud Platform – Paul Fremantle

Cloud platforms are going to be essential for developers to get the most out of Cloud. This session will help understand what is available, how cloud platforms work, how to evaluate Platfom as a Service and dive into the WSO2 Stratos Cloud platform.

The session will be a combination of presentation and live demo. In the session, Paul will demonstrate Stratos, a complete cloud platform available as Open Source as well as running as-a-Service on the web. Paul will describe the multi-tenant and elastic features of Stratos as well as demonstrate the broad set of services available.

Paul Fremantle is CTO and Co-Founder at WSO2, where he is part of the team that created Carbon (an OSGi-based open source middleware platform) and Stratos (an open source Cloud Platform). Paul is VP of the Apache Synapse project and an Apache Member. Paul has over 10 years experience contributing to Open Source projects and wrote his first line of Java in 1995. Paul also plays the tin whistle so you all better hope the demo system is working.

Cloud Foundry – Peter Ledbrook

The cloud is the big software development story of 2011 and now is the time to find out why. This talk will look at one of several cloud hosting solutions for Java web applications: Cloud Foundry from VMware. Learn how it works and what it means for you as a software developer. How does it impact application development? What are the benefits? These questions and more will be answered.

This will mostly be a presentation with perhaps a small demo. I’ll start by covering what a PaaS and give a brief overview of the current landscape. I’ll then introduce Cloud Foundry and go into some of the detail of how it works. Most importantly, I’ll be talking about how one writes Java applications for it and how developers have to change the way they think. If I have time, I’ll finish up with a short demo of deploying a Grails application to Cloud Foundry.

Peter Ledbrook is the Grails Advocate at SpringSource, now a division of VMware. He has been working with Java for well over 10 years now and has plenty of experience of deploy Java web applications. He was involved with Cloud Foundry several weeks before the beta announcement and has intimate knowledge of Cloud Foundry from a user’s perspective.

Who should attend:

– Java developers with an interest in the Cloud
– Integration or workflow developers interested in running their code in a cloud platform
– Technical Architects with an interest in the Cloud
– Undergraduates with an understanding of Java and enterprise middleware.

Agenda:

18:00: Doors Open
18:30: A series of lightning talks from members of the London Java Community
19:00: Main presentation 1 – Paul Fremantle will present WSO2 Stratos Cloud Platform
19:45: Main presentation 2 – Peter Ledbrook will present Cloud Foundry
20:30: Networking

Please Note:

Nearest tube: Barbican
Nearest Coffee Shop: Sun Coffee Shop, 55-63 Goswell Road, London, EC1V 7EN for if you arrive early
For after event drinks: The Slaughtered Lamb – 34-35 Great Sutton St, Clerkenwell, London, EC1V 0DX 

Please note this is an event organised for the London Java Community, the presenter has confirmed that it is suitable for entry level developers and undergraduates. SkillsMatter are hosting this event and are handling the attendance – it is essential that you confirm your place at this link: http://skillsmatter.com/event/java-jee/jvm-cloud-platforms/js-1945

 

Attendees: Trisha Gee; Mike Barker; Barry Cranford; Martijn Verburg; Ben Evans; Simon Maple

As an overall note, we didn’t assign action points to specific people in the meeting other than those whose names are mentioned above.  Rather than swamp ourselves with process, at the moment we’re feeling our way around to see what’s going to work best for us as a grassroots user organisation.

  1. The LJC will spin off a small group to handle JCP-related matters, so that we can keep it manageable but encourage a more active participation from members (i.e. more active than the associates group). This group will start off being those who attended this meeting, and will grow to include additional LJC members who have the time and interest to participate regularly.
  2. Members of the LJC JCP group are expected to turn up to all f2f meetings, and to be active and vocal participants of the group. This does represent a certain level of time commitment.
  3. Separate mailing list for LJC/JCP committee to be created (done!)
  4. We’ll send minutes of the JCP meetings to the new google group for the JCP committee.  A public summary will go into a monthly update blogpost (see next point)
  5. We (the LJC/JCP committee) will write blog posts about important events / topics related to what’s been going on in our JCP world. The blog posts will be pointed to via the usual channels (LJC mailing list, twitter etc).  We will also point the other Euro JUGs to these updates. At minimum, the summary of minutes will be posted – but there will be additional posts on topics of interest.
  6. If there’s an upcoming important topic to vote on, we will do lightning talks on the subjects at a suitable event so that we can inform the community about the issue and request feedback. Lightning talks will be delivered by a member of the JCP group.
  7. We will compile a list of open JSRs and encourage involvement from the LJC.  We should encourage people to “Adopt a JSR” – find out about it, present about it, get involved.  We should blog to suggest this, and we need to find ways to create a low barrier to entry for getting involved.
  8. Suggestion to do a session at the unconference on the JCP and our involvement
  9. Trish to prepare a lightning talk on the JCP and JSRs
  10. Mike to present a lightning talk on Project Coin
  11. ISSUE: If we have any physical paperwork from our involvement, where do we store it? Tabled for discussion at next meeting

LJC members – this is a rare chance for you to get involved in helping guide the future of the Java ecosystem! Please contact me (Ben Evans – @kittylyst on twitter, or through my profile on the LJC meetup.com site) and I’ll get you started!

As you hopefully already know, in May of this year, the LJC was voted onto the Executive Committee for Java SE / EE.

There’s a blog post about it here: https://londonjavacommunity.wordpress.com/2011/05/27/the-jcp-reform-and-what-it-means-for-the-java-developer/ if you missed the announcement and would like to find out more about what all of this means.

One of the first activities we’ve been involved in is the final vote to approve Java SE 7 as a standard. Based on the overall feeling of our membership, we voted “Yes” with this comment:

“The LJC votes Yes to the JSR for SE 7 based on its technical merit and our very strong desire to get Java moving again.

We note that the archives for some of the Expert Groups that comprise this JSR have not yet been made public, despite a promise from Oracle to do so. We do not feel that this is appropriate for a public and open standards body. In particular, Oracle’s silence as to why the archives have not been made public is harmful to community participation, i.e. the community has no access to historical technical discussions, which are vital for participating in future Java language initiatives.

Going forward, we are unlikely to support any JSRs that do not meet minimum standards of transparency.”

We feel that the cause of advancing Java is too important to hold up – and the JCP doesn’t really provide us with a mechanism for delaying a vote.

Packt has this week announced a series of discounts and promotions to herald the publication of a new WordPress book; WordPress 3 Ultimate Security. Readers will be offered exclusive discounts, 20% and 30% off the cover price of all WordPress print books and eBooks for a limited period only. 

WordPress is a semantic personal publishing platform with a focus on aesthetics, web standards, and usability. You can customize the features, incorporate your own design, and even write your own plug-ins with ease.

WordPress 3 Ultimate Security shows you how to hack your site before someone else does. You’ll uncover its weaknesses before sealing them off, securing your content and your day-to-day local-to-remote editorial process. This is more than some “10 Tips …” guide. It’s ultimate protection – because that’s what you need.

“WordPress is a topic that Packt is committed to publishing books on, and we are dedicated to providing interesting WordPress books that are both accessible and solution-based. Packt Open Source will continue to provide the WordPress community of users with practical books”, said Packt Open Source publisher Doug Paterson.

For more information on the WordPress discounts and promotions being offered throughout June, please visit: – http://www.packtpub.com/article/wordpress-month

Packt Publishing are a unique publishing company specializing in highly focused books on specific technologies and solutions – please visit their site to find out more about them: http://www.packtpub.com/

Each month we run a promotion with Packt in which LJC members will be selected at random to receive free books. This month we are offering 2 LJC members the chance to win;

First Prize Winner will receive 1 print copy of his/her choice
Runner Up Winner – 1 ecopy of his/her choice

Here are the books on offer this month, the winner will be picked at random and announced at the end of the month:

Apache Roller 4.0 – Beginner’s Guide                                   
OSGi and Apache Felix 3.0 Beginner’s Guide                        
Alfresco 3 Web Content Management                                   
Ext GWT 2.0: Beginner’s Guide                                             
Google Web Toolkit 2 Application Development Cookbook
Apache Wicket Cookbook    

To take part in the promotion all you have to do is send an email to me at b.cranford@clearview-itrs.co.uk with your name, your book choice and the address you would like your book to be sent. Please mark ‘Packt Publishing’ as the subject title.

Please visit the Packt site at www.packtpub.com

Congratulations to the winners of our May draw – George Profenza and Martin Velicky!!

Good luck,

Barry Cranford

What is the LJC

The London Java Community (LJC) is a group of Java Enthusiasts who are interested in benefiting from shared knowledge in the industry. Through our forum and regular meetings you can keep in touch with the latest industry developments, learn new Java (& other JVM) technologies, meet other developers, discuss technical/non technical issues and network further throughout the Java Community.

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