You are currently browsing the monthly archive for February 2012.

The London Java Community’s next free event is – ‘March’s Code Share: First Expressions’  on Wednesday 7th March at 6:30pm.

Please see link for details and to sign up – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/52643562/

March’s Code Share: First Expressions.

Code doesn’t just tell a computer to what to do. Code allows us to express ourselves, organising our thoughts and sharing them with others: both humans and machines. Code provides us with three mechanisms to do this: expressions, combination and abstraction.

This month we are going to look at the first of these: expressions.

Expressions represent the stuff that we are manipulating: procedures and data. Different languages provide different expressions. It is believed that the language we use affects the way in which we think. Wilhelm von Humboldt asserted in 1820 that “the diversity of languages is not a diversity of signs and sounds but a diversity of views of the world.” Is this true for software? Does the use of s-expressions in Lisp and Clojure cause the programmer to see the world differently to the Java developer?

Donald Knuth proposed literate programming, with code being read for other humans to read and understand as well as for a computer to execute.

The practitioner of literate programming can be regarded as an essayist, whose main concern is with exposition and excellence of style. … He or she strives for a program that is comprehensible because its concepts have been introduced in an order that is best for human understanding, using a mixture of formal and informal methods that reinforce each other.

http://www.literateprogramming.com/

In recent years this literate approach has made great advancements in the area of testing. Consider, for example, Behaviour Driven Development and the use of simple sentence templates that allow programmers and domain experts to share the same language. Dan North writes:

Developers discovered it could do at least some of their documentation for them, so they started to write test methods that were real sentences. What’s more, they found that when they wrote the method name in the language of the business domain,the generated documents made sense to business users, analysts, and testers.

http://dannorth.net/introducing-bdd/

All languages are designed to help the developer express themselves more clearly (well, nearly all: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brainfuck). Their designers, however, have taken many different approaches. Paul Graham argues that extensibility is the key to clarity. The programmer is given the ultimate freedom of building a new language for every new problem.

As you’re writing a program you may think “I wish Lisp had such-and-such an operator.” So you go and write it. Afterward you realize that using the new operator would simplify the design of another part of the program, and so on. Language and program evolve together… In the end your program will look as if the language had been designed for it. And when language and program fit one another well, you end up with code which is clear, small, and efficient.

http://www.paulgraham.com/progbot.html

On the other hand the creator of Python, Guido van Rossum, believes that the key to readability is to limit the developer’s choices so that they are forced to adopt a familiar style.

Readability is often enhanced by reducing unnecessary variability. When possible, there’s a single, obvious way to code a particular construct. This reduces the number of choices facing the programmer who is writing the code, and increases the chance that will appear familiar to a second programmer reading it. Yet another contribution to Python’s readability is the choice to use punctuation mostly in a conservative, conventional manner.

http://www.python.org/doc/essays/foreword/

The Diabolic Developer doesn’t care how code can be made clear because he doesn’t want anybody else to be able to read it.

  • Keep information to yourself.
    • Knowledge is power.
      • Think job security. Never provide documentation.
    • Make sure only you can read your code.
      • Don’t put comments in your code. Name your variables A,B,C….A1,B1, etc.
      • If someone insists you format your in a standard way, change a small section and revert it back as soon as they walk away from your screen.
  • The Diabolical Developer: How to Become Awesome

How do you feel about literate programming? Have you discovered a language that allows you to express yourself with ease and clarity? Have you written code that makes a difficult problem comprehensible? Do you have some ugly code that you just can’t clean up? Is there something that others insist on doing in the name of readability that you find incomprehensible?

We would like to hear your thoughts. Better still, we would love to see your code. Please come along and share.

Please see link for details and to sign up – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/52643562/

Hi All,

Tuesday night, we had a superb LJC event with some of the top speakers and trainers in Brazil. It was a packed room, had very few no shows and all the feedback I have had since has been amazing.

For those that didn’t know, Fabianne, Yara and Vinicius are heavily involved in SouJava, a 15 year old renowned Java User Group in Brazil. It was interesting to hear their thoughts and appreciation of the LJC. How they have watched us coming up as a younger JUG, and starting to make a lot of noise, the work that Martijn, Ben and our other organisers have done overseas has been incredible for our international profile and Yara said had injected energy and life into the entire JUG scene. Let’s keep going, make the Adopt a JSR program a success and get involved wherever we can.

The night kicked of with a few lightning talks from organisers and members of the London Java Community. First up we had Richard Gomes talking about Scala and Trisha Gee and Ben Evans to talk about the Adopt a JSR program. You can see both presentations here.

JavaEE Applications in Production: Tips and Tricks to achieve zero downtime. Fabiane Nardon one of Brazils most important and renowned architects did some live coding and live demos. Starting from a JavaEE application and add tools and techniques. It was a great presentation which you can watch here. Once SkillsMatter have uploaded the video.

Finally we had Yara and Vinicius Senger. They gave an animated presentation which was unlike any I have seen before. They showed how you can use Java EE and open-source hardware, like Arduino, to automatate your house. It involved a little singing and heavy breathing to turn lights on – certainly not what you’d expect from an LJC event. Again you can check it out here.

After the event we all headed to the White Lion for some Atlassian and RecWorks sponsored drinks and pizza. After much alcohol induced coercion I was able to pick up a few more people for the GDC Meet a Mentor program. We now have 42 mentors, more signing up and 3 universities involved. You can read an update on how it’s going here.

Special thanks to Yara, Vinicius and Fabianne who flew to London especially for the LJC. We know this is just part of a wider relationship with SouJava and look forward to how it develops. Big thanks also goes to our lightning talkers – there is a constant opportunity to get involved in these events – it’s a great way to escalate your profile which can lead to new opportunities and promotions, or just a way of sharing what you have learned with a group of enthusiastic developers. We can offer constructive feedback from experienced speakers so if you’re at all interested let Anji or I know.

Another big thank you to everyone that made it out last night. We are one of the most active Java User Groups in the world and we’re keen to stay that way so if you have any feedback at all please let Martijn or I know.

We at RecWorks are proud to have been able to organise another event for the LJC. RecWorks is a specialist consultancy blending social networks and recruitment services to provide first class service to our clients. We pride ourselves on building long term relationships with everyone we meet and being trusted advisors to the Java industry. For a list of our latest jobs please see our jobs page here. Follow us on Twitter.

Finally, a big thanks goes to Skills Matter for hosting the event.

Here are a few words from SkillsMatter:
Skills Matter are very pleased to be able to continue to support the London Java Community. Follow us on Twitter and use the hashtag #javasm and see below for some upcoming Java related events we think you’ll love!

Progressive Java Tutorials (May 3-4, 2012)

The Progressive Java Tutorials will take place at Skills Matter over two days on May 3rd and May 4th! Experts including Jan Machacek, Tobias Ivarsson, Jon Jagger, Howard Lewis Ship, and Anirvan Chakraborty will be sharing the latest ideas and best practices in Java and Agile Development. To find out more, follow #progjava on Twitter or go here.

Scala Days (April 17-18, 2012)

Skills Matter and Typesafe are very excited to present Scala Days 2012, coming to London this April. Scala Days is the premier event for Scala enthusiasts, researchers, and practitioners. A central part of the Scala Days event will be the Third Scala Workshop, a forum to showcase and discuss a wide range of cutting-edge Scala research projects.

In addition to the Workshop, further Scala Days sessions will be devoted to technical talks, experience talks, and tool demonstrations, offering a comprehensive insight on all that is going on in the Scala world. We have also planned social lunches and an evening Scala Days Reception, which will offer further opportunities to meet and discuss with all the people that matter in the Scala world in a relaxed social context. To find out more, go here.

Once again, many thanks to all who came to the event.

See you at the next one!

Barry

I know many of you do ‘Enterprise Development’ (Java/XML/Spring/Hibernate etc) so we thought we’d share a lightly different story of a different app stack. Bruce Durling is one of our oldest members (and helps run the Clojure group) and is working on something quite interesting with helping make Hadoop based data be ‘green and sustainable’ using Clojure (which is of course a JVM language).

As we put more and more pressure on data centres, it’s certainly an interesting area of research on how we can lower energy and resource costs. Do we have any other LJC members involved on the data centre side of ‘the cloud’ or otherwise?  I’d be interested to know whether Java/JVM based applications cause particular problems or perhaps solve them.

If you want to find out more about the Hadoop work, checkout Mastodon at http://startupchallenge.wazoku.com

Hi All,

On Wednesday night we had our monthly code share event, this time focusing on Dependency Injection and the way it is used in Java and other languages – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/48795462/

The code share kicked off at 6:30pm and lasted to 8:00pm – great to see so many turn out.  One things for certain, Spring doesn’t have to worry about going out of business anytime soon – nearly every developer that came along used DI and Spring.

It’s always great to hear your thoughts from these events, if you have any feedback or would like to suggest something please post it here: http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/48795462/

Dave Snowdon opened up the event and talked about dependancy injection before handing over to Dave Syers for the code presentations, special thanks to them for making the event so informative.

Thanks also to Vaibhav Gowadia, Sandro Mancuso, Luigi Bitoni and Maris Orbidans for contributing their code examples.

There is always an opportunity to get involved in these events- it’s a great way to share what you have learned and may open up new opportunities. We can offer constructive feedback from experienced speakers so if you’re at all interested let me know.

Queen Mary University was, once again, kind enough to provide the venue, so big thanks to them.

Big thanks also to Thoughtworks for graciously sponsoring another LJC event.

Once again, thanks to everyone that made it out last night. We are one of the most active Java User Groups in Europe and we’re keen to stay that way so if you have any feedback at all please let Barry or Martijn know.

Finally, here at RecWorks we are connecting Java developers to some of London’s top companies. If you’re not happy in your current role then feel free to give Andrew, Kenric or myself a call or email for an informal chat. We are far more interested in building long-term relationships than one off placements, but if you do feel the time is right now we are happy to help.

See you next time.

Thanks,

Aaron

Hey guys,

We have had a cracking start to the year for the LJC. We had 66 new members join and have over 2125 members now which is awesome and had a whopping 490 RSVPs although I think some of this was down to the generosity of QCon, JFokus and Packt with their competitions.  Well done to Savvas Dalkitsis and Caspar MacRae – JFokus, Miles Burton – QCon, Donald Matheson and Rob Cook – Packt. We’ll keep our feelers out on other give aways that we can get for you, if anyone knows of upcoming conferences we could sponsor to get a free ticket just let me know. We also started our fortnightly events email service to let you know about events going on with our User Group partners around London. The next one should be out within a few days.

Events

The 11th of Jan was our most popular Code Share to date and was on Concurrency. Some great feedback “really enjoyed this. Some very good speakers and really learned a lot” Dave Snowdon and Ged Byrne have got a superb event going now, with a combination of repeat offenders and new comers, I would definitely recommend checking them out if you are interested in developing your programming skills by stripping everything back to the code. The next one is on Dependency Injection tomorrow (already fully booked), but I understand that they have plenty more lined up.

We then had our monthly Developer Sessions on Tuesday 17th, which was sponsored by our kind friends, Atlassian. Here is some feedback lifted straight from the event page:

“Awesome event, discussed 2 start-ups, some graph theory for my open source project and a heap of other interesting conversations!”
“Good chat. Met some interesting people. More enthusiastic now about my own projects after talking about them.”

For anyone that hasn’t come along to one of the Developer Sessions event that is interested in the social side of programming you should definitely get along. Again, we have about half the people are first timers, so if you are new to London or just looking to make a few friends then please do come down.

We also had the OpenJDK Hacknight event on the 31st of Jan in which we saw around 20 patches created!!

Finally, on the 1st February we had our event on Xtend and Xtext “Xtend was more interesting than I thought it would be as it actually produces Java Source code instead of its own byte code. This effectively means that it is safe to use in traditionally conservative environments.” Thanks to Sven and Sebastien for that. If you’re interested the link for the video can be found on the SkillsMatter page here

JCP news

Along with the OpenJDK Hack night event we have had some other things going on. The LJC initiated adopt a JSR program has also been featured in the latest Oracle magazine. It’s great to see that not only is this program having a significant difference on Java as a whole but it’s being recognised, supported and promoted by Oracle themselves.

* The global ‘Adopt OpenJDK’ program will be launching very soon. Once again the LJC is at the heart of this program

* Adopt a JSR continues to roll along.  In part due to the work that the LJC team lead by James Gough and Richard Warburton, the Spec lead for JSR-310 (Date and Time) has officially announced that Oracle will work with them to get it merged into the OpenJDK in time for Java 8.

* LJC based Adopt a JSR presentations are being sent out to the JUGs across the world and have been presented at a bunch of meetings and conferences already.

Sponsors

Jobs – RecWorks

Firstly a word from myself and RecWorks, the LJC Founders. For those that don’t know RecWorks is my company, we are a specialist consultancy working as an integral part of the London Java Community. We are focussing on both recruitment and developing talent within developers and as part of this organise events for the LJC and the GDC as well as assisting many other technical user groups around London. We work with many of the best employers of Java developers in London and cover every sector from investment banking to social gaming, working with blue chips to startups. I am pleased to announce that our 12th member Tanya Paterson has just started with us as an Executive Director to help us in our with our continual growth. Thanks from all the continual support from LJC members, any feedback or anything we can do for you let me know.

January was a record month for us, which is highly rare. We were able to help a lot of members find new roles and hope that it is a sign of things to come this year. Here are a few of our latest and greatest positions.

We have a new role for a mid-senior Java developer working for the industry leader in online media. This role is perfect for an experienced developer looking to take their career to the next level. The role is a fixed one year contract paying up to £55,000 and can be found here: http://jobs.recworks.co.uk/online/ViewJob.aspx?JobId=996

We have another position looking for a candidate passionate about multithreaded programming and concurrency. This is a company in the financial space with whom we have a lot of history with. The candidate does not need to have any experience with financial industry in the past, just a high level of interest in writing low-level multithreaded code. They will consider candidates with a range of levels of experience, it is a permanent position paying £50-£70,000 and can be found here: http://jobs.recworks.co.uk/online/ViewJob.aspx?JobId=864

The next role is for a senior java developer working for one of the most exciting gaming companies in London. This would suit a mid-level developer who wants to work in a vibrant, test driven team using the latest Java technologies. More details can be found here: http://jobs.recworks.co.uk/online/ViewJob.aspx?JobId=725

A leading open source software consultancy are looking to recruit. They are interested in receiving CVs from candidates at every level from graduate to experienced, but are only interested in candidates with a passion for open source software development using Java or involvement in community work. If you are interested please contact me at bc@recworks.co.uk

Training – Skills Matter

SkillsMatter are the premier European training organisation who run courses in Central London. They host many of our free evening events. They have upcoming events on a host of technologies including Spring, TDD, Groovy and Grails. More details can be found about all their courses here: http://skillsmatter.com/go/java-jee

Member benefits

As always, you can check out our growing list of benefits of being involved in the LJC including the Aggrity site, the LJC Book club and discounts to conferences. For more information see our Benefits Google doc here:http://www.tinyurl.com/ljcbenefits

Coming this month

Please check out our events email which should be with you later this week, it will have details not only of our events but the others going on with other communities. A few of the things we have planned for the next few months include a NoSQL panel event which should be announced soon, an event at QCon, an event on getting into finance, an LJC podcast and potentially a concurrency mini conference so stay tuned.

Final note

Over the last four years, we have watched as the LJC has developed and even transformed the careers of developers in London. There is a long and growing list of speakers that did their first lightning talks with the LJC and are now being invited to speak at international conferences, we have people that are organising their own user groups, starting businesses they love or working within OSS projects they would never have known about. Software development is a career like no others, you can have a massive effect on your career in your own spare time and we are happy to make it as easy as possible. We are always looking for more of you to get involved with what we are doing so if you would ever like to get involved in organising an event, giving a lightning talk or just being an opinion for which direction we should take the LJC in next then let us know. At the very least, please forward this post on to anyone you know that may get some value from our events.

We are looking forward to seeing you soon.

Warm regards,

Barry Cranford & Martijn Verburg

Hi All,

Last night, we took a look at two exciting and upcoming technologies, Xtend and Xtext. It was a very interesting event and ran from 6.30 pm until 8.30 pm- there was a lot of great discussion so thanks to everyone that contributed to the night.

Xtend is a new programming language designed specifically for Java developers, whilst Xtext is an open-source framework for developing domain specific languages.

Here is the event page – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/41282572/

Some great feedback on there already, but if you have something else to say then please add it as a comment here – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/41282572/

The night kicked of with a few lightning talks from organisers and members of the London Java Community. First speaker was Matijn Verburg, who took to the stage to explain the benefits of adopting a JSR.

The other lightning talk was from Ged Byrne, who gave an excellent review of Ebin Hewitt’s book, Cassanda: the definitive guide.

We then moved on to our final presentation “Xtend and Xtext”, presented by Sven Efftinge and Sebastian Zarnekow.

The presentation showcased the two technologies very well and provoked a lot of debate. It’s very clear that Xtend and Xtext are going to have interesting futures in the world of software development.

Firstly, a massive thanks goes to Sven and Sebastian, who flew in all the way from Germany to give the presentation.

Big thanks also goes to both of our lightning talkers – there is a constant opportunity to get involved in these events – it’s a great way to escalate your profile which can lead to new opportunities and promotions, or just a way of sharing what you have learned with a group of enthusiastic developers. We can offer constructive feedback from experienced speakers so if you’re at all interested let me know.

Another big thank you to everyone that made it out last night. We are one of the most active Java User Groups in Europe and we’re keen to stay that way so if you have any feedback at all please let Barry or Martijn know.

We at RecWorks are proud to have been able to organise another event for the LJC. RecWorks is a specialist consultancy blending social networks and recruitment services to provide first class service to our clients. For a list of our latest jobs please see our jobs page here.

Finally, a big thanks goes to Skills Matter for hosting the event.

Here are a few words from SkillsMatter.

Skills Matter are very pleased to be able to continue to support the London Java Community. Follow us on Twitter and use the hashtag #javasm and see below for some upcoming Java related events we think you’ll love!

Progressive Java Tutorials (May 3-4, 2012)

The Progressive Java Tutorials will take place at Skills Matter over two days on May 3rd and May 4th! Experts including Jan Machacek, Tobias Ivarsson, Jon Jagger, Howard Lewis Ship, and Anirvan Chakraborty will be sharing the latest ideas and best practices in Java and Agile Development. To find out more, follow #progjava on Twitter or go here.

Scala Days (April 17-18, 2012)

Skills Matter and Typesafe are very excited to present Scala Days 2012, coming to London this April. Scala Days is the premier event for Scala enthusiasts, researchers, and practitioners. A central part of the Scala Days event will be the Third Scala Workshop, a forum to showcase and discuss a wide range of cutting-edge Scala research projects.

In addition to the Workshop, further Scala Days sessions will be devoted to technical talks, experience talks, and tool demonstrations, offering a comprehensive insight on all that is going on in the Scala world. We have also planned social lunches and an evening Scala Days Reception, which will offer further opportunities to meet and discuss with all the people that matter in the Scala world in a relaxed social context. To find out more, go here.

Once again, many thanks to all who came to the event.

See you at the next one!

Aaron

What is the LJC

The London Java Community (LJC) is a group of Java Enthusiasts who are interested in benefiting from shared knowledge in the industry. Through our forum and regular meetings you can keep in touch with the latest industry developments, learn new Java (& other JVM) technologies, meet other developers, discuss technical/non technical issues and network further throughout the Java Community.

Twitterfeed

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.