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The London Java Community’s next free event is – ‘Introduction to Cassandra and the DataStax CQL Java driver for Java Developers’ on Tuesday 24th September at 18:30.

Please see link for details and to sign up – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/138582452/

Presented by Johnny Miller

This talk will will provide a high level overview of Cassandra intended to give developers an understanding of what it does and how it works. The main part of the talk will introduce developers to the tools and techniques for building Java applications using Cassandra. This will include the Cassandra Query Language (CQL) version 3 and the DataStax Java driver. An example application will also be developed and demonstrated. The goal of the talk is to show Java developers how to interact with Cassandra and give them an appreciation of how Cassandra works.

The presentation will be given via a powerpoint presentation with some live coding.

The subjects covered will include:

– High-level overview of Cassandra

– CQL3

– DataStax CQL Java driver

Who should attend

Java developers who want to start building applications using Cassandra or start using the new Java driver would benefit from this event. The talk will aim to give developers a high level understanding of Cassandra and introduce them to CQL3 and the new DataStax Java Driver for Cassandra.

Bio

Johnny is an experienced  developer and architect who has been working with Cassandra for several years. He is currently a Solutions Architect at DataStax where he helps companies deliver systems using Cassandra. Previously, he was an independent consultant and worked with various clients including Sky – where he developed several systems using Cassandra. He is from Ireland and lives in London with his wife and two labradors.

Please see link for details and to sign up – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/138582452/

Organised by RecWorks:

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Hi guys,

It seems like the weather has taken a change and Autumn is settling in, I hope it won’t discourage you from getting out for some great events this month. We have been running a series of events called Meet a Mentor events, in which industry professionals meet with students to help explain areas they should be focussing on and career options. We are going to be running a lot more events and need more mentors that can give up as little as one evening a year to help out. If you’re interested or want to know more, please email me at sh@recworks.co.uk. In the mean time I thought I would share with you some great events that are happening in London over the next two weeks that you may well be interested in attending:

Monday 16th September – London Groovy & Grails User Group Meetup
In this talk, David Dawson, Principal Consultant at Simplicity Itself, will give his thoughts and experiences of development in large scale, offshore heavy environments, and the tricks and techniques that he has learned to maintain, protect and improve a codebase over the lifetime of a project. Covering offshore teams, philosophy, boredom and the importance of cake, David will be revealing what has worked, and what really hasn’t, the scars those experiments left behind and lots of thoughts for the future.
London Groovy & Grails User Group – http://www.meetup.com/london-ggug/events/132695102/ *THIS EVENT HAS HAPPENED NOW BUT DO PLEASE CHECK THE LINK FOR FUTURE EVENTS*

Monday 16th September – Evening Code and Coffee / Craft Beer
Similar to our morning Code and Coffee sessions, there is no strict format, only an opportunity to meet with like minded craftsmen, and discuss or collaborate on whatever you would like to.
Unlike our morning Code and Coffee sessions, you don’t have to get out of bed at some ungodly hour to be here. Just rock on down after work to find other night owls.
We’ll be meeting in “”Look mum no hands!””, a laptop friendly cafe/bar that’s open until 10pm, and sells great coffee, good beers, and some tasty food if you make it before 8:30. They also repair bikes and hang them from the ceiling like chandeliers, because why not?
http://www.lookmumnohands.com/
London Software Craftsman Community – http://www.meetup.com/london-software-craftsmanship/events/134321732/ *THIS EVENT HAS HAPPENED NOW BUT DO PLEASE CHECK THE LINK FOR FUTURE EVENTS*

Monday 16th September – In The Brain of David A. Dawson: Development in the large, musings on maintaining a healthy codebase over the years
In this talk, David Dawson, Principal Consultant at Simplicity Itself, will give his thoughts and experiences of development in large scale, offshore heavy environments, and the tricks and techniques that he has learned to maintain, protect and improve a codebase over the lifetime of a project.
Covering offshore teams, philosophy, boredom and the importance of cake, David will be revealing what has worked, and what really hasn’t, the scars those experiments left behind and lots of thoughts for the future.
Skills Matter – http://skillsmatter.com/podcast/java-jee/development-in-the-large-musings-on-maintaining-a-healthy-codebase-over-the-years *THIS EVENT HAS HAPPENED NOW BUT DO PLEASE CHECK THE LINK FOR FUTURE EVENTS*

Tuesday 17th September – The London Developer Sessions
You absolutely have to get to this event – it’s the best place to come, drink beer and just socialise with other developers. Talk about projects you’re working on, problems your facing, advise a grad or two or just come to discuss anything you like. It’s a great chance to meet first time LJC members as well as seasoned professionals. Ged will be there with a few LJC Book club members. The RecWorks crew will be there to give any career advice or new job opportunities as well as a few Adopt a JSR advocates to help explain how you can get involved. Really what reason do you have not to come along?
London Java Community and Graduate Developer Community – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/137350802/

Tuesday 17th September – Code & Coffee (London Bridge)
Code & Coffee is a cool meeting for those who like coffee and love writing code. The idea is simple. Just come along and you may find other developers writing some code before going to work while drinking some coffee and/or having breakfast.
Caffe Fratelli
Victor Wharf, Clink Street, London SE1 9DG
London Software Craftsman Community – http://www.meetup.com/london-software-craftsmanship/events/131392772/

Tuesday 17th September – Code & Coffee (Central London)
Code & Coffee is a cool meeting for those who like coffee and love writing code. The idea is simple. Just come along and you may find other developers writing some code before going to work while drinking some coffee and/or having breakfast.
Starbucks
55-59 Oxford Street, Marylebone London, W1D 2EQ, London
London Software Craftsman Community – http://www.meetup.com/london-software-craftsmanship/events/131302132/

Wednesday 18th September – New JMS features in GlassFish 4.0
GlassFish 4.0 is the application server to support the new Java EE 7 standard. One of the most significant components of Java EE 7 is JMS 2.0, which is the first revision to the JMS (Java Message Service) API for over a decade and which introduces a new and much simpler API. This talk will review the new features of JMS 2.0 and other recent messaging-related changes in GlassFish 4.0. Presented by Nigel Deakin. Nigel is a Principal Member of Technical Staff at Oracle.
GlassFish User Group – http://www.meetup.com/GlassFish-User-Group/events/130184872/

Thursday 19th September – Scala Coding Dojo
A regular coding dojo session run on every third Thursday of the month. The dojo is now held regularly at the central London offices of TIM Group.
London Scala User Group – http://www.meetup.com/london-scala/events/127942552/

Thursday 19th September – ClojureFest with LJC and London Clojurians’
An evening of short talks from London-based Clojure experts to help you get started with Clojure, Concurrency, Java inter-operability. A dev clinic will be held afterwards with some experience Clojure hackers to help you install a working development environment on your laptop.
London Java Community – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/138309612/

Tuesday 24th September – Introduction to Cassandra and the DataStax CQL Java driver for Java Developers
This talk will will provide a high level overview of Cassandra intended to give developers an understanding of what it does and how it works. The main part of the talk will introduce developers to the tools and techniques for building Java applications using Cassandra. This will include the Cassandra Query Language (CQL) version 3 and the DataStax Java driver. An example application will also be developed and demonstrated. The goal of the talk is to show Java developers how to interact with Cassandra and give them an appreciation of how Cassandra works.
London Java Community – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/138582452/

Tuesday 24th September – Code & Coffee (West London)
Code & Coffee is a cool meeting for those who like coffee and love writing code. The idea is simple. Just come along and you may find other developers writing some code before going to work while drinking some coffee and/or having breakfast.
Caffe Nero
6 Hammersmith Broadway, London, W6 TAL
London Software Craftsman Community – http://www.meetup.com/london-software-craftsmanship/events/134321792/

Tuesday 24th September – Code & Coffee (Old street)
Code & Coffee is a cool meeting for those who like coffee and love writing code. The idea is simple. Just come along and you may find other developers writing some code before going to work while drinking some coffee and/or having breakfast.
Look mum no hands!, 49 Old Street, London, EC1V 9HX
London Software Craftsman Community – http://www.meetup.com/london-software-craftsmanship/events/134321802/

Wednesday 25th September – Compensating Transactions: When ACID is too much
ACID transactions are a useful tool for application developers and can provide very strong guarantees, even in the presence of failures. However, ACID transactions are not always appropriate for every situation…..
JBoss User Group – http://www.meetup.com/JBoss-User-Group/events/134890212/

Wednesday 25th September – Women, Computing and Social Change. Is there reality beyond the have-it-all fantasy?
Will the computing industry catch up with the social change already happening in law, business and other professional sectors, and why are we not leading the way?
Why are our working lives becoming harder not easier? How does that affect our career and family decisions? What is happening to gender roles in society: domesticated dads, working mums, career girls? From high-flyers to supporting acts, female and male roles are now changing radically and gender camps are fragmenting. Will the computing industry catch up with the social change already happening in law, business and other sectors, and why is it not leading the way?
Join us for what will be a fascinating evening. This event is open to everyone. Networking and drinks from 6pm. Event will start just after 6.30pm. Four great speakers, and Q&A/debate session.
Use the promo code LJC25 for free registration to this event. Register HERE> http://www.kweekweek.com/woinco/3458777902

Wednesday 25th September – Say Cheese!
Jeff Gilfelt looks at the Android Camera APIs and the new CWAC-Camera project
More details to follow…check the link..
London Android Group – http://www.meetup.com/android/events/137908182/

Thursday 26th September – JavaFX hands-on session
The next Manchester Java Community meetup will be a hands on session on JavaFX.
Bring your laptops and power cables and try a JavaFX tutorial (available on the day).
Manchester Java Community – http://www.meetup.com/ManchesterUK-Java-Community/events/133516832/

Monday 30th September – Arduino Robots
At 6.30pm at Google Campus
Join us for an evening of presentations and discussions around Robots and easy-to-use platform Arduino.
London Arduino Group – http://www.meetup.com/LondonArduino/events/137921582/

Thursday 3rd October – Sky-sponsored hackergarten
We’ll be hacking on various Groovy-based projects! Learn Groovy techniques while contributing to the community.
London Groovy & Grails User Group – http://www.meetup.com/london-ggug/events/138718092/

Thats everything for now, looking forward to seeing you all at the developer session on Tuesday.

Have a awesome weekend.

Sam

@SHRecWorks

 

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What’s this all about?

The Java Community Process is the mechanism for defining specifications relating to Java.  These specifications are called Java Specification Requests (JSR) and there can be multiple implementations, for example, JSR 315 defines the latest servlet standard and software such as Tomcat and Glassfish implements this standard.

The London Java Community have a vote on the Executive Committee of the JCP which sets out the overall direction of the JCP and represents the interests of both its direct members and also the general membership of the Java community at large.  In order to complement the many informal discussions with developers that we regularly undertake the JCP Committee decided to run a survey in order to reach a wider audience. Here’s a summary of the 322 responses that we had!

1. Are you more likely to use a Java technology because its an implementation of a JSR?

An overwhelming 74% of respondents said yes, against 16% saying no.  We also asked people to explain why they said this. The obvious answer as to why is vendor neutrality, and this was chosen in a number of responses.

More surprisingly one of the other running themes from this question was that people felt that technologies that are backed by standards are more likely to be around in the long term and therefore something that you can rely on. In recent years the rapid deprecation and retirement rates of SaaS products and APIs has certainly drawn attention to this issue.

2. Would you like to see the JCP developing standards around any of the following areas?

NoSQL 169 18%
Data Analysis and Big Data 132 14%
Platform as a Service (PAAS) Cloud Computing 134 14%
Non-JMS Messaging Protocols (AMQP etc.) 98 10%
An app store or approach to deploying Java apps in app stores. 88 9%
I’d like to see more effort put into refining existing Java SE standards than creating new ones. 141 15%
I’d like to see more effort put into refining existing Java EE standards than creating new ones. 118 12%
I see little to no value in standardising new areas. 21 2%
I’d like to see standards, but these technologies aren’t mature enough. 36 4%
Other 27 3%

The most popular response, by far, was support for NoSQL databases. In many ways this is an ideal candidate for providing useful APIs around: different vendors all providing different competing products which developers get locked into. Of course there are many technical challenges surrounding the design of such a standard, given the differing merits and suitabilities of different products in the space (e.g. Document stores vs Graph DBs etc).

The next pack of popular options was led by improvements the Java SE. Java 8’s major overhaul of many core library and language components shows the existing JCP commitment to continuously improve core Java. The LJC shall continue to champion the evolution of Java SE through the Adopt OpenJDK program.

The standardisation of data analysis and PaaS platforms was also in high demand, giving us a solid idea of what developers want in next few years.

3. If you’ve not participated in the JCP what is the reason?

I don’t know how. 219 85%
I don’t think the JCP serves my interests. 30 12%
I am not interested in the technologies it standardises. 3 1%
I don’t think standardising Java technologies has much value. 5 2%

One of the most successful contributions that the LJC has made to the JCP is the introduction of the Adopt-a-JSR program which helps encourage developers to get involved in contributing to standards during their development.  We were quite surprised to hear that the most common reason for not participating is that people don’t know how. Its pretty obvious that JCP members, the LJC included, need to make more effort to publicise and explain the JCP and demystify it to day-to-day developers.

4. What type of software do you write?

We use a full stack Java EE system. (eg Glassfish, JBOSS, Websphere) 155 20%
We use an alternative enterprise stack that uses some Java EE components (eg Spring) 180 23%
We have written our own framework/architecture from scratch. (even if you re-use other ecosystem components such as Hibernate) 101 13%
We use an alternative framework (eg Play, Vertx, Grails, Hadoop) 85 11%
We use Java SE/Core Java components in our product. 225 29%
We’re developing using Java ME application. 7 1%
Other 13 2%

Very few people were actively using Java ME. This isn’t a particularly surprising result and validates JSR 355’s approach of merging the ME and SE/EE executive committees.

Conclusion

With the recent release of JavaEE 7 and Java 8 coming out soon, this is a great time for day to day developers to get involved with the next set of Java standards.  In particular there are strong requests for improvements to core Java and having standardisation introduced for the wave of recent NoSQL technologies.

Please join us at Adopt a JSR, Adopt OpenJDK and on the JCP to help shape the future of Java!

Thanks,

The LJC JCP Committee

The London Java Community’s next free event is – ‘ClojureFest with LJC and London Clojurians’  on Thursday 19th September at 18:30.

Please see link for details and to sign up – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/138309612/

An evening of short talks from London-based Clojure experts to help you get started with Clojure, Concurrency, Java inter-operability. A dev clinic will be held afterwards with some experience Clojure hackers to help you install a working development environment on your laptop.


Clojure by Example

Demonstrating the elegance of the Clojure language by looking at example code and demos:

– core.async is a library for async programming & communication.

– overtone is an amazing environment for creating music and sounds.

– core.logic is a logic programming library offering a Prolog-like relational programming, constraint logic programming, and nominal logic programming for Clojure.


Nuts and Bolts – Clojure and Java playing nicely together by
Jen Smith, Thoughtworks (25 mins)

Showing how easy it is to use Java libraries from within Clojure and vice versa.  Covering some of the design patters useful for Java & Clojure interoperability.


Concurrency in Clojure – 
Malcolm Sparks, JUXT (20 mins)

What makes Clojure so good for multi-threaded programming and why


Nuts and Bolts – Getting started – John StevensonSalesforce &Heroku (30 mins)

Now you have seen Clojure in action we will show you how to set up a development environment and other useful tooling to help you build software with Clojure.

We will look at Leiningen as a humane build tool (no more XML), Emacs if you want more of a Lisp like experience, LightTable if you want a ClojureScript experience, Eclipse & Netbeans if you want to stick with the Java tools you are used too.
If there is time we will also show how to deploy Clojure to the Cloud with Heroku.

 

Please see link for details and to sign up – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/138309612/

 

Organised by RecWorks:

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Hi all,

The committee meets once a month in person and has several discussions on their mailing list about Java standards and how the LJC should cast its vote for each Java Specification Request (JSR).

As per our informal charter, we blog about any changes in the membership of this committee. On this occasion Kim Ross has stepped down temporarily to other commitments.

Kim was a fantastically pragmatic minded member of our committee with a sharp eye towards what was sensible and useful for the day-to-day Java developer. She also bought extra expertise in the form of NoSQL and caching technologies and the views from the gaming sector.

====

We welcome to the fold Gemma Silvers (a LJC stalwart) who is currently heading a technology team at Amazon. We’ll be relying on her experience in dealing with the modern cloud an large Java/JVM deployments.

Also joining us is Sean Landsman who brings us extensive experience from inside the Java enterprise trenches across a multitude of sectors (yes, including finance, it is London after all!). Sean helps balance out the group with his experience of seeing large Java shops in action.

Last but not least we have Daniel Bryant who comes with an impressive academic CV and and extensive career as a contractor / consultant. Daniel has also been hard at work on some of the LJC’s open source projects, such as Betterrev

So thanks again Kim and welcome to Gemma, Daniel and Sean!

Martijn (on behalf of the LJC JCP committee)

PS: We’re always looking for more people to help us out – so if you have a passion for Java as a platform and want to help it stay relevant and vibrant going forwards then let us know!

The London Java Community’s next free event is – The London Developer Sessions on Tuesday 17th September at 18:30.

Please see link for details and to sign up – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/137350802/

This is our monthly social gathering, which incorporates members of The London Java Community and Graduate Developer Communities. This is an informal social evening most of the evening will be spent having ad-hoc informal discussions in small groups.

We are back to The Slug and Lettuce this month: 19/20 Hanover Street, London http://www.slugandlettuce.co.uk/hanover_street/. We have had some fantastic feedback from those who have attended the event at this venue before and will be holding this month’s event in the same great location. The venue has a nicely sized function room with its own private bar, there are some great offers on beer, there is free wi-fi and it’s easy to move around and chat to lots of people. Most importantly it is a friendly and relaxed environment where developers can get together to chat and network.

The event will kick off at 6:30 PM and usually goes on until around 11:30 with members coming and going at all times throughout the evening. We usually attract 50 – 70 members so it is a lively event in which members, both junior and senior, can connect in a relaxed atmosphere and set the development world to rights.

Barry or another RecWorks team member will be onsite so if anyone is looking for free recruitment advice it’s a great chance to come along for a chat.

Please see link for details and to sign up – http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/events/137350802/

Organised by RecWorks:

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What is the LJC

The London Java Community (LJC) is a group of Java Enthusiasts who are interested in benefiting from shared knowledge in the industry. Through our forum and regular meetings you can keep in touch with the latest industry developments, learn new Java (& other JVM) technologies, meet other developers, discuss technical/non technical issues and network further throughout the Java Community.

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