TLDR: Go to microprofile.io and join the mailing list there and fill out the survey!

Recently the LJC officially put its support behind MicroProfile, a new open source project and collaborration between Java EE vendors and the developer community to provide enterprise developers comfortable with Java EE a way to move into the microservices space.  The LJC will host hackdays as Microprofile gets closer to its first GA release in September 2016.

The recent interview with JAX Enter sums up the current state nicely, so I’ve repeated it here verbatim.

JAXenter: Red Hat, IBM, Tomitribe, Payara and the London Java Community joined forces to create MicroProfile. What are the objectives of this initiative?

Martijn Verburg: The initial goal is to provide developers who are most comfortable with enterprise Java (Java EE if you will) a starting point to work with microservices in a non vendor specific way (which is what they’re used to from the Java EE world).  The aim is then for the developer community to actually drive what they feel they need in microservices runtime/API, so instead of the vendors ‘guessing’ that you might want security, or logging or discovery or whatever. It’ll be up to the MicroProfile community to help define what should go in and what should stay out.

Some open standards will likely fall out of this to give businesses confidence about the longevity and the vendor neutrality, which is something they’ve enjoyed and trusted from the Java EE ecosystem.

JAXenter: What is the London Java Community’s take on the current state of Java EE? How can MicroProfile bring it forward?

Martijn Verburg: Java EE has clearly stalled with the lack of progress on Java EE 8. Although many of us feel that the time for the monolithic Java EE platform standard is possibly over, there’s still enormous value in having standards around key pieces of Java Enterprise technology. Enterprise Java does after all still drive billions of dollars worth of IT business and directly or indirectly drives trillions of dollars in the global economy.

JAXenter: How is the goal of MicroProfile different from Java EE Guardians’? What is the London Java Community’s contribution to this new initiative?

Martijn Verburg: The goal of MicroProfile is to bring collaboration around microservices for enterprise Java developers.  This is very separate to the Guardians group, who are advocating Oracle to put resources back into the Java EE 8 platform.

JAXenter: How can MicroProfile push forward microservice innovation in Enterprise Java?

Martijn Verburg: By asking the community what they want and releasing early and often.  Then standardizing on what the community and the vendors feel are the right APIs that need longevity.

JAXenter: Do you hope to generate a reaction from Oracle?

Martijn Verburg: We hope they join in the initiative!  Oracle has shown that it can lead in open source via OpenJDK and we know that like all vendors, they have an interest in microservices.  Some common ground between all of the vendors and the community will help ensure that enterprise Java is well placed for the challenges going forwards.

JAXenter: How can the community participate in the MicroProfile effort?

Martijn Verburg: By going to microprofile.io and joining the mailing list there, filling out the survey and shortly contributing code!