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Up coming conferences
The autumn conference season is upon us and I have written a quick overview of the most notable events.  If you have never been to a conference before it can seem quite expensive, however it is cheaper than a training course and in terms of what it can do for your motivation and career development, the right conference is a very worthy investment in yourself.

Community events
After the summer  holiday, the number of community events is increasing again.  Here are some things to watch out for

Tonight the London Clojurians are have their monthly dojo at the Thoughtworks offices in High Holborn and its a great way to get a quick shot of functional programming experience in a very friendly and enthusiastic environment. Free sign up.

On Wednesday night the London Software Craftsmanship group are having a group code review.  This is a great way to experience different coding styles, get feedback on your code should you submit some and practise reviewing code so it becomes a natural and flowing task.

Monday 3rd October the London Clojurians have an intriguing “performance” on using Overtone, a Clojure front-end to the state-of-the-art realtime sound synthesis engine SuperCollider.  There will be sounds galore as the live coding session steps you through the architecture and some of the deeper computational questions that working in a musical context forces you to answer.  It sounds a blast, so sign up for free.

Not to be outdone by the Clojure community, there is a Scala Lift-off 2 day conference at SkillsMatter on the 13th-14th October.  If you want to practice your Scala with others, then TIMGroup (YouDevise) are hosting the London Scala user groups monthly dojo, this month on the 20th October.

For something lean and agile, Kevin Ryan is a great speaker on all things kanban and system thinking, drawing from many years experience working with teams and helping them become more effective.  Get your flow going and sign up to his talk on the 6th October.

New > UK Atlassian community
If you use JIRA, Greenhopper, Confluence or the development tools from Atlassian, there is an opportunity for you to get involved in this new community.  On 26th October they have the first event, a launch party and community kick-off, sponsored by Atlassian so there will be some swag on offer.  If you are interested, please join the UK Atlassian community and make your voice heard (or listen out for how you can bag some swag).

There are lots more events coming up so there are plenty of opportunities to learn and get involved with the community – making new friends and finding new opportunities.

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Events coming up

There is another fun and engaging Clojure Coding dojo on Tuesday and is as popular as ever as the event is full.  It will be the last dojo before my “Getting started with Clojure” talk at JAX London, so am looking forward to learning some more things I can put into the talk.

Simon Maple and Zoey Slattery are also running the “OSGi: Lets get started” event on Tuesday.  This will be a great way to understand OSGi and what it can do to help your Java development and deployment.

Please see the list at the end of this email for a full schedule of up coming events. 

News
Time is running out to contribute to the community testing of the Java SE 7 Developer Preview Release .  The latest build is feature complete, stable and ready to roll – so download, test and report bugs before the April 4th deadline.  If you submit a bug report before the 4th, the Java product team will sing your praises on the Java SE 7 Honor Role, plus they will send you some Java swag. Bugs reported later on might not get fixed in time for the initial release, so if you want to be a contributor to Java SE 7 do it before the April deadline.

Firefox 4 was officially released last week and has already broken all the browser download records, with twice as many downloads as IE9 in the space of 24 hours.  In less than a week there have been around 37,000,000 (37 million) – which you can see if you head over to the neat looking download stats page, a great example of data visualisation and interaction.  Its good to see Europe beating North America at something, as we are still ahead in numbers of downloads.  Inside of Europe, Gernany is well ahead of everyone else and has more than twice the downloads of the UK.

Full Circle #47 is out and includes more programing in Python, LibreOffice and eBook Reader Software.  There is also a special edition: The Perfect Server detailing how to build a an Ubuntu 9.10 server and configure lots of common server services, available in English and Italian.  Even though its based on the older Ubuntu 9.10 server, all the steps are pretty much the same for the lasted 10.10 server version.

There are more videos available from The Server Side Symposium, including this short about Java 7 from two people you may recognise.

Summary of Last weeks events
At the Weekday testers event, there were over 40 testers online across several countries trying out different aspects of Firefox.  Javascript processing is much improved and makes certain sites much quicker to load.  Flash support seems much better and watching flash videos seemed quicker to load and start than in Chrome.  If you get the very latest build of chrome (or chromium on Ubuntu) then firefox was a few milliseconds slower, but the page rendering differences were hard to measure as they were so close.  I still use Firefox and Chromium together for my browsing, mainly so I can have different accounts on the same sites. 

Cuke Up was a great day of behaviour driven development and acceptance testing with many of the project leaders and influential people speaking or chatting between talks.  Highlights of the day for me include:

Matt Wynne – Mortgage Driven Development
Dan North and Liz Keogh – Deliberate Discovery
Aslak Hellesoy – Keynote and Cucumber update

It was great to hear that Cuke4Duke, the cucumber style acceptance testing framework will be getting a major upgrading to make it simpler to use.  Currently it runs via JRuby and a few other libraries, so the plan it to make it more Java like so you can use Cucumber.java.  There is also active development in the management of all your scenario files with the development of the Relish tool,  a web based tool to manage and navigate through your scenario files.  You will also be able to work with your cucumber files via a website, allowing you to edit your scenarios and features, making it very easy for non-technical team members to work with cucumber.  To see some of the soundbites of the conference, look at the twitter tag #cukeup

Podcasts
Applying Lean Software Development Principles Throughout the Organization

If you have write-ups of any events, please let the list know or send them directly to me.

Thank you

John Stevenson@JR0cketJR0cket.co.ukJR0cket.comLeanAgileMachine.com

Events coming up

This week there is the talk on ScalaZ by the London Scala user group and the Developer round table by the London Software Craftsmanship community.

Tonight (Monday 7th) I am running a games night to help people learn and explore kanban, lean and system thinking.  I am joined by Karl Scotland who is another experienced practitioner with experience of delivering agile and kanban practices to many organisations.  If you are new to kanban and the ideas behind it, then its a great opportunity to learn more in a practical way (no kanban experience required).  Many teams are starting to adopt kanban, so its a good time to learn.  If you have been using kanban for yourself or you team, then you can share your experience as you play the games and learn some ideas from others.

The LJC are running a Getting Started session on OSGi by Simon Maple (IBM) and Zoe Slatery (IBM) soon and you may want to read the blog post Martijn wrote on OSGi as a warm up.

From Martijn Verberg blog post – As OSGi matures as a technology for application developers and with Jigsaw also coming into the mix around Java 8, now is a good time to learn about modularisation technologies in the Java space.

For those of you who want to practice your test driven development skills, there is a code retreat on 12th March down in Winchester.  You will get a full day of TDD coding in a collaborative way and get to share ideas as a group.  If anyone wants the LJC to run another code retreat in London then why not suggest it as a meetup event.

If you want to practice your Clojure skills and learn more about functional programming, the March Clojure dojo (29th) is almost full, so sign up soon.

On Monday 14th I am running a workshop on distributed versus centralised version control, comparing git / mercurial / bazaar with subversion.  The workshop is mainly aimed at students and graduates, so if you know anyone who would benefit from this workshop, please let them know.

News
Full Circle magazine #46 is now out, full of useful guides and news on Ubuntu.  A special python programming edition has also been published to help get you started with the language.

Last week there was a major release of GlassFish Server 3.1.  This release extends the Java EE 6 Reference Implementation with new application development capabilities, centralised administration and high availability features.  Also including improved OSGi support for Java EE Applications, OSGi web console and Apache Felix 3.0.6 (Apache Gogo shell).  Another good feature is that when applications are re-deployed, GlassFish maintains HTTP session and EJB state, enabling rapid iterative development.  If you are new to Glassfish, also have a look at the community website.

Last week was also the first release (war) of Jenkins Continuous Integration server, since moving from the Oracle trademarked name Hudson.  There has been a flood of developer activity on GitHub and the project is looking very healthy.  There are also packages available for Ubuntu and Debian.  I’d be really interested in hearing from anyone else who has tried Jenkins CI, especially migrating from Hudson.

Summary of Last weeks events
There was a good sense of camaraderie and sharing of painful experiences as I discussed the frustration of working for a company with a Mafia-like culture.  It seems that there are still a great number of companies out there that have problems looking at the way they work, with everyone too busy getting on with today’s work (problems) without knowing if its really benefiting the organisation.  I had lots of questions in the pub afterwards and lots of feverish scribing during the talk, so I hope I imparted some useful survival tips and maybe the seeds of change. 

JAX London Preview night was a little wobbly, due to the fact we were on a boat on a busy Thames river.  I think the wavey nature of the boat added to the ambiance of the evening though.  There were two great talks that evening, one on event driven architecture with Comet and the other on lots of new things in spring 3.1 (features just released that day).  Everyone that braved the cold had a good evening and we were treated to drinks at the bar by the JAX London team (on Facebook now).  I had all the vitamins and minerals I needed for the rest of that week from the Guinness that was bought for me.  Thanks everyone.

I had my first book review published on Slashdot.org after a lot of trial and error.  The book was on Inkscape, a really great example of open source software which can be used to create all sorts of graphic design work, from simple buttons and logos to complete web site designs.  The Slashdot.org submission process is a bit fiddly and not quite so clearly documented as I’d like, so I wrote my own guide.  Thanks to Packt Publishing for supplying the Inkscape book.

If you have write-ups of any events, please let the list know or send them directly to me.
Thank you.

JAX, the conference series on Java, Enterprise Technology, Agile, SOA and Cloud, is coming to the UK for the first time and will run alongside OSGi DevCon from 22nd – 24th February 2010. 

We have 5 delegate places to giveaway to JAX London for members of the London Java Community.

This is your chance to attend one of next year’s most important events in the Java development calendar.  Each place is worth up to £600, and could be yours for free.

Simply send me an email – cv@mailcv.co.uk with ‘JAX London’ and let me know if you’re interested in being entered for the prize draw. The deadline is Monday 7th December, shortly after we’ll announce the 5 lucky winners.

If you are not one of the lucky winners you can still attend and save money too.  We have negotiated a special discount for members of London Java Community giving you an extra 5% off delegate places – just enter the special discount code ‘LJC01’ when you book your place.

These discounts can be applied to already reduced ‘very early bird’ delegate rate offers, giving you a double saving if you book early.

Book by 17th December and you can get:

1 day delegate pass – only £189.05

2 day delegate pass – only £331.55

3 day delegate pass – only £474.05

This is your chance to hear from speakers including Architecture Expert Kevlin Henney, Enterprise Architect & Language Expert Ted Neward, Charles Nutter – creator of JRuby, Guillaume Laforge – Groovy Project Lead and many more…

Visit www.jaxlondon.com for further information and to check out confirmed content and speakers so far.

Barry Cranford

I have created a Wikimap for anyone to contribute to. The aim of the map is to make it easy for students, graduates and entry level programmers to understand the industry and decide which route seems more appealing.

I need help from the LJC to add to the map and highlight areas that I have missed or information that you feel would be useful.

It can be found here: http://www.mindmeister.com/34704025/a-career-in-software

jamescowboy

James Ward: The RIA Cowboy

We have just confirmed a new Free Meetup from Adobe’s James Ward: Click the above link to RSVP.

RIAs with Java, Spring, Hibernate, BlazeDS, and Flex

Java developers want to use what they already know to build great software.

Rich Internet Applications allow us to build better software but with many of the options out there developers have to replace what they know with a new software stack. This session will help you learn how to use what you already know to begin building RIAs. For those new to Flex the session it will cover the basics of connecting a Flex application to a Java back-end powered by Spring and Hibernate. There will be tons of code aimed at those looking to make the move to RIA.

As usual we will find a suitable bar to frequent after the presentation for a free sponsored drink from myself.

James Ward is a Technical Evangelist for Flex at Adobe and Adobe’s JCP representative to JSR 286, 299, and 301. Much like his love for climbing mountains he enjoys programming because it provides endless new discoveries, elegant workarounds, summits and valleys. His adventures in climbing have taken him many places. Likewise, technology has brought him many adventures, including: Pascal and Assembly back in the early 90’s; Perl, HTML, and JavaScript in the mid 90’s; then Java and many of it’s frameworks beginning in the late 90’s. Today he primarily uses Flex to build beautiful front-ends for Java based back-ends. Prior to Adobe, James built a rich marketing and customer service portal for Pillar Data Systems.

Design by Daniel Smallman – http://www.vanillachipcookie.co.uk/artwork.html

Barry Cranford

PacktLogoLJC/Packt Publishing Monthly Book Promotion

We have some new sponsors of technology books to the group. Packt Publishing are a unique publishing company specializing in highly focused books on specific technologies and solutions.

We are running a new promotion which will be taking place every month in which ONE LJC member will be selected at random to receive a free book.

Each month we will send you a list of 10 books. To take part in the promotion all you have to do is send an email to me at b.cranford@clearview-itrs.co.uk with your name, your book choice and the address you would like your book to be sent. Please mark Packt Publishing as the subject title.

Here are the books on offer this month, the winner will be picked at random and announced at the end of the month.

  1. Drools JBoss Rules 5.0 Developer’s Guide
  2. Liferay Portal 5.2 Systems Development
  3. JDBC 4.0 and Oracle JDeveloper for J2EE Development
  4. Alfresco 3 Enterprise Content Management Implementation
  5. Flex 3 with Java
  6. Spring 2.5 Aspect Oriented Programming
  7. JBoss Drools Business Rules
  8. JBoss Portal Server Development
  9. WebSphere Application Server 7.0 Administration Guide
  10. Blogger: Beyond the Basics

This offer is only open to LJC members. Membership is free, if you’re not already a member and would like to take part, please sign up here: http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/

Good luck to you all.

Barry Cranford

Some of our members have agreed to present on a variety of subjects. Here are a selection so far:

– How to introduce Scala into your project/business/enterprisecrowd
– OSGi
– Real Time Java and related tooling
– Running a Successful Open Source Project
– A “Better Code”
– A “How to be a true Rock Star Developer”
– Financial Data Warehouse project

Click here to sign up: http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/calendar/11677002/

http://www.recruitersoft.com/online/clearview/ViewJob.aspx?JobId=706logo

Core Java, J2SE, SQL, Gaming, Server Side, Central London, 45k

I have a number of positions working within a rapidly growing gaming company. My client are looking to grow by recruiting server side Java developers with exceptional design and development skills in Core Java & SQL. The role will involve focusing on core programming requirements around performance, reliability, scalability and security.

The ideal candidates they are looking for will need to have at least 4 years experience in Java J2SE & SQL. They are looking for people prepared to work as part of a hardworking focused team. The role is based in Central London and paying up to 45k.

For more information send me an email at b.cranford@clearview-itrs.co.uk

Have you got something interesting to say about Java? Want to talk to other people with similar interests?

The London Java Community are pleased to announce that their first ‘unconference’ will run on Saturday November the 28th 2009.

What is an unconference? It is defined on Wikipedia as a “facilitated, participant-driven conference centered around a theme or purpose” http://en.wikipedia.o… Our theme will be Java….

We know that Java is a fairly broad subject area – but we didn’t want to limit creativity by narrowing the scope. This leaves people free to talk on the Java language, Spring, Hibernate, Open Source and Java, OSGi, perhaps even JVM languages, anything Java that you want….

As is traditional with this type of event, the content will be provided by the audience. To help us ensure that we have enough conference rooms, we are asking you to indicate whether or not you intend to speak at the event. We are also charging a small fee to attend – this is simply to cover costs (lunch, coffees etc), the aim is to break even on the event. Any profit will be put behind the bar after the event.

Thanks to a LJC member Zoe Slattery and our own Martijn Verburg for the organising of this.

To sign up please visit our official site http://www.meetup.com/Londonjavacommunity/calendar/11677002/

What is the LJC

The London Java Community (LJC) is a group of Java Enthusiasts who are interested in benefiting from shared knowledge in the industry. Through our forum and regular meetings you can keep in touch with the latest industry developments, learn new Java (& other JVM) technologies, meet other developers, discuss technical/non technical issues and network further throughout the Java Community.

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